Chris Benschoter

Chris Benschoter

Technology Teacher, Grades 6, 7 and 8

Mr. Ben (it's easier for students to say and remember) joined The Upper School Faculty in 2007 to teach technology. He grew up in California and graduated with a bachelor's degree in Business and a master's degree in Education from San Jose State University in the heart of the Bay Area, where he went on to work in Information Technology in education and business for companies including Intel and Applied Materials. Acting on faith, he decided to make the leap into full-time teaching and moved with his wife to Colorado -- and CHC!
In addition to his love for all things technological, Mr. Ben is an avid San Francisco Giants fan and amateur numismatist. He loves spending time with his wife and their three children -- one of whom is a Lion.
Mr. Ben says because he can tend to be a bit of a worrywart, his favorite Bible verses are Matthew 6:25-34: “Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they? Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?
“And why do you worry about clothes? See how the flowers of the field grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith? So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own."